Posted by: boromax | April 12, 2022

Similes to Make You Smile

owlcation.com

I just finished reading Jerome Weidman’s ‘Other People’s Money’ (Random House, 1967). It is a good read, although I found the culmination of the story somewhat less than satisfying. However, I think I understood the overarching point of the tale in the end. Anyway, this post is not meant to be a review of the book.

In the paragraph I include below, the author alternates between simile and metaphor. The affect is honestly a bit startling at first, even confusing; then it is just amusing. Nevertheless, the reader ends up with a pretty clear (and colorful!) image of what is being described.

Near the end of the book, a new character is introduced. The author’s physical description of this character struck me as some of the most unlikely strings of similes and metaphors I have ever read, just about. They definitely made me smile. In fact, I actually laughed out loud, and my wife asked me what I was laughing about; so of course I read her the passage, which I am about to share with you. Hopefully, you will find it to be an exemplary (and amusing) pile of similes and metaphors.

The setting for this scene is a country estate in rural England in 1939.

Here it is:

“Leaning far across the green table, delicately fingering his cue into position, was a man in orange-brown tweed knickerbockers who had clearly borrowed his face from Clive Brook. One eye was covered with a black patch. A rimless monocle was set as firmly in the folds of skin around his other eye as an imitation ruby in the navel of a belly dancer. Through the bit of glistening glass he regarded the white ball with all the fierceness of a district officer in a Kipling story examining a Hindu cutpurse brought into his presence by the policeman who had caught him in the act of rifling the cashbox in the Officers’ Club. The cue moved back, then streaked forward. The white ball shot across the table. There was a click, followed by a series of muted thuds. The monocle moved like a swaying punkah, following the intricacies of the shot. Then the man stood erect, and Victor understood why a country that on the map of the world was no larger than a gravy stain on a tablecloth had ended up owning most of the tablecloth: the look with which Sir Iselip Nolan stared out at the world through his good eye was that of a property holder in Darien, Connecticut, regarding a group of Talmudic students settling on his lawn for a kosher barbecue.”

. . . . . . . . . . . .

So. What do y’all think? Have you ever…?


Responses

  1. Boromax,

    Very clever and descriptive.

    Thanks, Gary

    On Tue, Apr 12, 2022 at 10:22 AM ~ Trivial Music Silliness ~ wrote:

    > boromax posted: ” owlcation.com I just finished reading Jerome Weidman’s > ‘Other People’s Money’ (Random House, 1967). It is a good read, although I > found the culmination of the story somewhat less than satisfying. However, > I think I understood the overarching point o” >

    • Thank you, Gary!

  2. Oh, wow!! That was fun!! Haha!

    Thanks for that!!

    • You’re welcome!


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: